Masters 4 – Tainted Love
7:30PM, Saturday, February 9, 2019
TCU Place, Sid Buckwold Theatre
35 – 22nd Street East
Saskatoon, SK S7K 0C8
Eric Paetkau, Music Director
Andréa Tyniec, violin
Saskatoon Youth Orchestra

Passion and tragedy abound as the SSO brings Prokofiev’s masterwork Romeo and Juliet to life for the first time in decades. Shakespeare’s tale of young lovers has been the muse for many composers, but none captured it with fervor than Prokofiev.

Violinist Andréa Tyniec has made a name for herself as a fearless interpreter of virtuosic modern concertos, so we’re thrilled she’s making her SSO debut with Peteris Vasks’ Distant Light.

The Saskatoon Youth Orchestra joins the SSO to open the evening with Berlioz’s Carnival!

Single tickets on sale August 1st.

Roman Carnival Overture – Hector Berlioz

Youth Overture – Airat Ichmouratov

Distant Light, Concerto No 2 – Peteris Vasks

~Interval~

Romeo and Juliet, selections – Sergei Prokofiev

Violinist Andréa Tyniec has created a versatile performance career as a soloist and as a collaborator with dance and theatre; and is recognized as a promoter of contemporary music, particularly of Canadian new works.  Acclaimed for her “exceptional musicality and intensity” (La Presse), she has performed as a soloist internationally and across Canada with orchestras such as l’Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal led by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the Niagara Symphony led by Bradley Thachuk, the Calgary Symphony led by Eric Paetkau, the Münchener Kammerorchester (Germany), I Virtuosi Italiani (Italy), and the Akbank Chamber Orchestra led by Cem Mansur (Turkey).

Andréa premiered and recorded André Ristic’s violin Concerto with the Ensemble Contemporain de Montréal+, led by Véronique Lacroix (ATMA), and toured Canada with the ECM+ to premiere Alec Hall’s violin concerto. She released her “simply stunning” (The WholeNote) recording of the Six Sonatas for Solo Violin by Eugène Ysaÿe in 2015. She plays on the Baumgartner Stradivari (1689), on loan by the Musical Instrument Bank of the Canada Council for the arts.

Her latest performances include the premiere of her show “Forgiveness is Freedom”, a performance and healing ritual for brave audiences in collaboration with Dany Lyne; a reprise of her role in the play Infinity by Hannah Moscovitch in Toronto and on tour in Ontario; and a performance of the sublime “Distant Light” violin concerto by Peteris Vasks with Sinfonia Toronto. In the 2017/18 season, Andréa will be premiering and performing Ana Sokolovic’s Violin Concerto with l’Ensemble Contemporain de Montréal +.

Among the many awards and honors she has received, Andréa is the 1st Prize winner of Italy’s Andrea Postacchini International Violin Competition 2008. Andréa performed her Debut recital at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam in 2009, and has performed internationally in Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Italy, Holland, Germany, France, Poland, Turkey, and in the USA.

Born to Polish and Bolivian parents and raised in Montreal, Canada, she completed her bachelor’s degree in Music Performance at the Conservatoire de musique de Montréal with Professor Sonia Jelinkova, followed by a master’s degree in Music Performance at Michigan State University. While she was based in Europe, Andréa completed her Solistendiplom at the Hochschule Musik und Theater Zürich and her Konzertexamen at the Hochschule für Musik Karlsruhe with Professor Josef Rissin. She also participated in masterclasses with Salvatore Accardo at the Fondazione Walter Stauffer in Cremona, Italy, and was greatly inspired by her studies with Professor Ana Chumachenco. She is a graduate Fellow of the Glenn Gould School of the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto.

Roman Carnival Overture – Berlioz

Le carnaval romain, ouverture pour orchestre (Roman Carnival Overture), Op. 9. Composed in 1844 and first performed at the Salle Herz, Paris, on 3 February 1844. A stand-alone overture intended for concert performance, made up of material and themes from Berlioz’s opera Benvenuto Cellini, including some music from the opera’s carnival scene – hence the overture’s title. It is scored for large orchestra, is in the key of A major, and features a prominent and famous solo for the cor anglais.

Content from wikipedia.

Distant Light – Vasks

In the years before writing “Tala gaisma” (Distant Lights), I had often thought about writing a large-scale work for violin, especially after completing my cello concerto.

In summer 1996 Gidon Kremer asked me to write a violin concerto for the newly founded youth orchestra for the Baltic countries “Kremerata Baltica”. During this time I was reading Gidon Kremer’s book “Moments from Childhood”. The moods of this book have been a major influence on this concerto. I started writing in autumn 1996 and finished the 30-minute-work in spring the following year.

The concerto is in one long movement, with contrasting episodes and three cadenzas for the soloist. The main theme comes from silence and returns to silence, full of idealism and love, sometimes melancholic and dramatic. The first notes grow slowly, without hurry; then, the light-sad cantilena sets in. After Cadenza I, an extensive theme starts with low bass chords gradually gaining strength and intensity. With a sudden change of tempo and character the following episode begins; in it, I used a musical language which is close to Latvian folk music. Candenza II brings into the music a slight different character which disappears in an energetic tutti.

After this burst of energy, silence returns. The lyrical violin line leads to a second, dramatic episode. Cadenza III and the following aleatoric part form the centre of the concerto. The aleatoric chaos is interrupted by a robust, even agreesive waltz rhythm. In the recapitulation the musical ideas of the opening return. Although there is a sound of hurt for a second, the concerto dies away in bright sadness. Once again, the waltz sounds – now as a reflection of distant memories.

“Tala gaisma” is dedicated to Gidon Kremer, my former classmate, whom I met again through music. The concerto is a commission from the Salzburg Festival and was premiered on 10 August 1997 with Gidon Kremer and the Kremerata Baltica conducted by Saulius Sondeckis.

– Peteris Vasks

Romeo and Juliet – Prokofiev

Based on a synopsis created by Adrian Piotrovsky (who first suggested the subject to Prokofiev) and Sergey Radlov, the ballet was composed by Prokofiev in September 1935 to their scenario which followed the precepts of “drambalet” (dramatised ballet, officially promoted at the Kirov Ballet to replace works based primarily on choreographic display and innovation). Following Radlov’s acrimonious resignation from the Kirov in June 1934, a new agreement was signed with the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow on the understanding that Piotrovsky would remain involved.

However, the ballet’s original happy ending (contrary to Shakespeare) provoked controversy among Soviet cultural officials. The ballet’s production was then postponed indefinitely when the staff of the Bolshoi was overhauled at the behest of the chairman of the Committee on Arts Affairs, Platon Kerzhentsev. The ballet’s failure to be produced within Soviet Russia until 1940 may also have been due to the increased fear and caution in the musical and theatrical community in the aftermath of the two notorious Pravda editorials criticising Shostakovich and other “degenerate modernists” including Piotrovsky. The conductor Yuri Fayer met with Prokofiev frequently during the writing of the music, and he strongly urged the composer to revert to the traditional ending. Fayer went on to conduct the first performance of the ballet at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Suites of the ballet music were heard in Moscow and the United States, but the full ballet premiered in the Mahen Theatre, Brno (then in Czechoslovakia, now in the Czech Republic), on 30 December 1938. This version was a single-act production with music mainly from the first two suites. Prokofiev was not able to attend the premiere due to his status of outbound restriction.

Content from wikipedia.