Mozart’s Flute Concerto
7:30PM, Saturday, April 4, 2020
Knox United Church
838 Spadina Crescent E
Saskatoon, SK S7K 3H4

Eric Paetkau, music director
Naomi Ford, flute

The SSO is celebrating the start of spring with by bringing back our mini-Mozart Festival!  Concerts through the week will lead up to this very special evening featuring Mozart’s Symphony No. 29.

We’re thrilled to present flutist Naomi Ford in her SSO debut with Mozart’s Flute Concerto No. 1.  Naomi was the winner of the Grand Award at the National Music Festival in 2017, and the SSO had teamed up with the National Music Festival to present the Grand Award winner.  We never knew we could expect an artist of this calibre!

 

Single tickets on sale August 1st

Flute Concerto No. 1 in G Major – Mozart

Symphony No. 29 in A Major – Mozart

 

*remainder of program announced in January 2020

 

Flutist Naomi Ford is currently studying at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia with Jeffrey Khaner. At Curtis, she holds the Julius Baker Fellowship and is completing her first year of studies. Having played both piano and flute from an early age, Naomi has regularly participated in music festivals around the country as well as being awarded scholarships on both the national and provincial level. At the 2017 National Music Festival of Canada, at the age of 16, she was placed first in the woodwind category and subsequently won the Grand Award Competition, becoming the first New Brunswick musician to win in over 20 years. In the summer of 2018 she was named one of the “30 hot Canadian classical musicians under 30” by CBC Music and has been featured in news stories across New Brunswick and Canada. Naomi has taken part in masterclasses taught by Jasmine Choi, Mathieu Dufour, Sonora Slocum, and Robert Aitken. She has also participated in summer programs across the country, including the Domain Forget International Music and Dance Academy and the National Youth Orchestra of Canada where she was named an Award of Excellence winner in 2019. A fervent believer in the power of music to transform and educate, Naomi looks forward to using music to teach as well as to inspire through solo, chamber, and orchestral performances. She is frequently asked to perform in concerts throughout Atlantic Canada, including Jeunesse Musicales gala concerts and tours, chamber music concerts at the Barachois Summer Music Festival, and solo performances with Symphony New Brunswick.

Naomi’s home is in Riverview, New Brunswick, where she enjoys spending time with her family. When not practicing or performing, she can be found enjoying the outdoors with archery and skiing, or indoors crocheting with a cup of chamomile tea.

The Flute Concerto No. 1 in G major, K. 313, was written in 1778 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Commissioned by the Dutch flautist Ferdinand De Jean in 1777, Mozart was supposed to provide four flute quartets and three flute concertos, yet he only completed two of the three concertos, K. 313 being the first. The Andante for Flute and Orchestra K. 315 may have been written as an alternative slow movement for this concerto, but there is no extant manuscript and it is therefore difficult to ascertain Mozart’s intentions clearly.

 

The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774. It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner

The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main theme.