History of Halloween

Every year on October 31st we put on fun costumes and get our fill of Halloween candy. But how did it all begin?

The ancient Celts celebrated their new year on November 1st. They marked the end of harvest, and their new year’s eve with a festival called Samhain.

Believing that the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead were blurred, on October 31st the Celtic people would commemorate this event with huge sacred bonfires. They would burn sacrifices to ehrie Celtic deities, wore costumes, and tried to predict each other’s futures.

Fastforward to 40 AD and the majority Celts have been conquered by the Roman Empire. Over time there was a blending of Celtic and Roman festivals including Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead, and the day to honour Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. Perhaps this is why we bob for apples?

By the 9th century christianity had spread amonst Celtic lands and blended with older Celtic rights. Christians celebrated All Souls’ Day, potentially in an attempt to replace Samhain and other non christian celebrations with a church approved holiday. The All Saints day was also known as All-Hallows or All-hallowmans, and the night before as All-Hallows Eve, which ultimately became Halloween.

As settlers moved to North America, they brought their Halloween traditions from all over europe. People started handing out candy in exchange for not being tricked, and the day became more secular and community focused.

These days Halloween is filled with fun costumes, tiny candies, and themed concerts!

We hope you have a wonderful, and fun filled Halloween!

Leave a Comment