Mozart ReReimagined

He’s entirely entranced by Aloysia…but he falls for Constanza. Did we mention that his sister has ambitions too?

In March of 2020 the artists were ready to fly in and we had this unique collaborative project ready to go….so to bring it to life we’ve re-reimagined Mozart!

The SSO teams up with Saskatoon Opera to create a new theatrical work centred around reimagining the music and stories of Mozart.

Saskatchewan composers Kendra Harder, Danika Lorèn, Tiess McKenzie, and Alexander Tosh each took on the challenge of reimagining an aria from Mozart’s vast repertoire – the results are refreshing, creative, and captivating!

Vocalists Olivia Guselle, Emma Johnson, and Kelsey Ronn bring to life three important women in Mozart’s life…their letters back and forth with the Maestro become the basis of this new story.

Mozart himself comes to life through dancer Kyle Syverson, with choreography by Jackie Latendresse of FreeFlow Dance.

Danika Lorèn pulled triple duty for this unique musical experience – not only was she one of our emerging composers, but she is the creator behind the concept and director. Adding to the curiousity of creating this project in a pandemic, Lorèn directed virtually from her home in Toronto!

Conductor Maria Fuller leads the SSO Chamber Ensemble in this one of a kind performance!

The performance is available to watch until August 4th!

Buy Digital Ticket











 

 

Trans and Non-binary Composer and Artist Panel Discussion

Over the last year, Kendra Harder (she/hers) and the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra have been offering free online courses for the public about female composers, focusing on their experiences, the reasons for their erasure from textbooks, and, naturally, the wonderful music they have created. As an extension of this class, we are hosting a panel discussion dedicated to Trans and Non-Binary composers and artists.

This discussion will explore various aspects of navigating the performing arts and composition worlds from a trans or non-binary perspective while celebrating the constellation of genders that exist in the world.

Being on YouTube Live, there will be an opportunity for a question and answer period to create an interactive international experience!

When: Wednesday, June 16th at 11:00am-12:00pm CST
Where: https://youtu.be/FW7neafVLTc

Our five panelists:

respectfulchild (they/them)

https://respectfulchild.com

respectfulchild is an interdisciplinary artist born, raised, and living as an uninvited guest on Treaty 6 Territory. Their work explores the quiet tensions and chaotic beauty of being a queer Chinese settler on the prairies, ranging from spontaneous improvisation to meticulous composition. Their debut album 在找::searching:: was released in the summer of 2017 on Coax Records and they have toured across Canada and Europe with artists such as Rae Spoon, A Tribe Called Red, and Jeremy Dutcher.

The name respectfulchild is the literal translation of their Mandarin name 敬兒[jìng er]. This name was given to them by their grandmother when they were born, a name and a culture they’ve become estranged from having lived their whole life in the predominantly white world of the Canadian Prairies. The music of respectfulchild is their quiet way of seeking meaning in 敬兒 again.

Theo Baer (he/his)

https://itboytpb.bandcamp.com

Theo Baer is a Brooklyn-based composer and performer. His work is the result of a diverse musical upbringing and journey towards emotional healing as a black and trans artist. His individual approach to melodic sound is influenced heavily by an eagerness to adapt and experiment with a variety of genres. These compositions illustrate an intimate and vulnerable narrative channeled through the manipulation of tape loops, synthesizers, keyboards, and other electronic voices.The resulting pieces reflect an eclectic upbringing in musical performance. iT Boy is Baer’s solo electronic project.

ig: @itboytpb

Dr. CN Lester (they/them)

http://www.cnlester.com

CN Lester is a writer, musician, academic, and leading LGBTI activist. Co-founder of the UK’s first national queer youth organisation, they curate the trans art event Transpose for Barbican, and work internationally as a trans and feminist educator and speaker. Their work has featured on BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, SBS, The Guardian, ABC, The Independent, Newsnight, and at Sydney Opera House.

A singer-songwriter and a classical performer, composer and researcher, CN specialises in early and modern music, particularly by women composers. Gigs/engagements include work at The Barbican, Southbank Centre, Snape Maltings, The Royal Exchange, Fluid Festival, Queer Prides throughout Europe, and art galleries/bars/recital halls/book and coffee shops/universities throughout the UK. They have released three independent, crowd-funded albums: “Ashes” (2012), “Aether” (2014) and “Come Home” (2017) – all available via iTunes, Amazon and Spotify.

“Trans Like Me” (Virago/Seal) is their first book, named as one of the three essential works on trans issues by The New York Times. With glowing reviews from The Times Literary Supplement and Publishers Weekly, “Trans Like Me” is a collection of essays on gender, society, history, and building better futures.

They live in London and drink too much coffee.

inti figgis-vizueta (she/her)

https://www.inticomposes.com

Originally from Washington D.C. and now residing in New York City, inti figgis-vizueta (b. 1993) focuses on close collaborative relationships with a wide range of ensembles and soloists. Her musical practice is physical and visceral, attempting to reconcile historical aesthetics and experimental practices with trans & indigenous futures. The New York Times speaks of her music as “alternatively smooth & serrated”, The Washington Post as “raw, scraping yet soaring”, and the National Sawdust Log as “all turbulence” and “quietly focused”. inti is the 2020 recipient of the ASCAP Foundation Fred Ho Award for “work that defies boundary and genre”.

Recent commissions include works for the Kronos Quartet, Attacca Quartet, JACK Quartet, Crash Ensemble, & Music from Copland House Ensemble, as well as Jennifer Koh, Matt Haimovitz, & Andrew Yee. Her music has been presented in spaces such as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Chicago Symphony Center, Kennedy Center, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Louise M. Davis Symphony Hall, and the Dublin National Concert Hall. She is currently in residency at So Percussion’s Brooklyn studio for the ‘21-22 season.

inti is a mentor for the ‘21-22 Luna Composition Lab & the Boulanger Initiative Mentorship Program and returning ‘21 faculty member for the Young Women Composers Camp. inti maintains a busy presentation schedule, with recent talks at McGill University, Manhattan School of Music, the LA Phil Composer Fellowship Program, UC San Diego, and UC Santa Barbara. inti also regularly appears on artist panels including engagements with National Sawdust/Center for Ballet & the Arts @ NYU, University of Kansas, American Composers Forum, and the New Latin Wave Festival.

inti studied privately with Marcos Balter, George Lewis, Donnacha Dennehy, and Felipe Lara. inti received mentorship from Gavilán Rayna Russom, Du Yun, Angélica Negrón, Tania León, and Amy Beth Kirsten.

inti loves reading poetry, particularly Danez Smith and Joy Harjo. inti honors her Quechua bisabuela, who was the only woman butcher on the whole plaza centraland used to fight men with a machete.​

Camille Rogers (they/them)

https://camillerogers.ca

As a performer, Camille Rogers (they/them) has been praised for their “tremendous stage presence” and “real flair for comedy” (Operaramblings).  Camille’s “gossamer mezzo-soprano” (Mooney on Theatre) has been described as “even-keeled and grounded even in times of intense physicality” (Schmopera).  Camille has also been recognized for their work as Co-Artistic Director of Toronto’s queer opera collective OperaQ, and has been invited to speak at related events hosted by Amplified Opera, the University of Toronto, and VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto.

Camille currently studies at the University of Toronto, pursuing a Doctor of Musical Arts with a Collaborative Specialization in Sexual Diversity Studies. Their research, supported by the prestigious Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship, investigates how problematic historical works of music theatre can be transformed and made relevant to today’s audiences through the bodies of modern queer performers.  As part of their studies, Camille is currently developing a narrative recital portraying the extraordinary life story of gender-non-conforming opera singer and duellist Julie d’Aubigny (1670-1707).  With OperaQ, Camille is in the process of producing a queer chamber opera with a libretto by award-winning Canadian poet Charlie Petch.

An active performer in many styles of opera, Camille most recently appeared as Suli/Suzie in Buddies in Bad Times’s world premiere of Pomegranate, and as Aeneas in Dido and Aeneas with OperaQ.  Other past engagements include the role of Lake in FAWN’s collectively improvised techno opera Belladonna, Young Girl in The Marriage of Figaro with Opera Atelier, and the title role of L’Italiana in Algeri with MYOpera.  Camille has also been featured as a soloist with the Toronto Bach Festival and Cor Unum Ensemble, and has presented solo recitals with Centric MusicFest and Lethbridge Pride Fest.

Musical Herstory 2.0

For centuries, the writers of musical textbooks (and the programmers of musical institutions) excluded women who composed.

Francesca Caccini (1587-1645)

Motherhood. Quarantine. Saving one’s self from the guillotine with their piano skills. Composers of today have a surprising amount in common with composers of yesteryear!
In this second instalment of Musical Herstory, we will continue looking at the amazing lives and music of female composers from the past and the present. We’ll look at works created across the years in those typically “male dominated” genres, the dual roles of mother and composer, and music from composers whom we know very little about.

The SSO is again proud to present Saskatoon composer Kendra Harder in this six week course exploring the herstory of music that you need to know!

Classes take place Thursdays at 7:00pm (Saskatchewan time) – each class is 60 minutes.

The first class takes place on May 13th, and will be available on video to those who aren’t able to attend the class live on Zoom.

Click here to Register!


How does it work?

Before the first class, you’ll receive an email that gives you access to the 6 weeks of scheduled Zoom classes.

If you can’t participate in the live Zoom class, you’ll have access to the video of the class on our YouTube channel.

Week One – Composer & Mother

Our society often expects that women become mothers, but not composers. What is it like for those who are both? 
What are the challenges faced by women in professional spheres attempting to balance raising children and creating 
a career?

Composers in focus: 
 - Allison Loggins-Hull – this week is inspired by her project “Diametrically Composed.”
 - Elizabeth Maconchy (1907 – 1994)

Week Two – Symphony Week

We enter the "male domain" of the symphony and look at what women have done in this sphere.

Composers in focus:
 - Amy Beach (1867 - 1944)
 - Alice Ping Yee Ho

Week Three – Almost Footnotes

There are so many composers (both male and female) where there is little biographical information about them, 
and in some cases absolutely none is to be found. As a result, these composers and their music are overlooked 
putting them at risk of simply being a footnote in textbooks. This week we'll spend time listening to music by
 composers whom we know little about.

Composers in focus: 
 - Cesarina Ricci (c. 1573 - ?)
 - Hélène de Montgeroult (1764 – 1836)
 - Eva Dell’Acqua (1856 – 1930)
 - Cecilia Arizti (1856 – 1930)
 - Lyse Gingras (b. 1949)

Week Four – Guitar Week

Solo repertoire for the guitar is a very heavy male-dominated field; but men are not the only ones to have picked up 
that beautiful six-stringed instrument to create music. This week will look at two fantastic guitar virtuosi whose 
music is finally coming back into the public consciousness.

Composers in focus: 
 - Ida Presti (1924-1967)
 - Catharina Pratten (1824-1895)

Week Five – Beautiful Blends

These two composers make amazing blends of music with their traditional music and the Western classical music. 

Composers in focus: 
 - Tanya Tagaq
 - Reena Esmail

Week Six – Opera Week

This genre of large-scale works has been hailed as the grand rite of passage for any serious composer, and therefore, 
was denied to women. This week will look at one woman who wrote some of the first operas, and is considered the
first woman to have composed an opera. Plus, we will look at what women are writing today!

Composers in focus: 
 - Francesca Caccini (1587 – 1645)
 - Nkeiru Okoye

On Bach’s Time – His Life in Music

Experience the Baroque era in a detailed look at the wondrous music, life and times of J.S. Bach. This course will be illustrated with musical examples and visuals, and musical snippets will be played on the keyboard to describe the content! Questions are encouraged throughout the course. 

Join us as we explore Bach’s eternal world together!

The SSO is proud to present Saskatoon pianist Dr. Sofia Mycyk in this six-week course.

Classes take place Fridays at 11:00am (Saskatchewan time) – each class is 60 minutes.

The first class takes place on April 30th, and will be available on video to those who aren’t able to attend the class live on Zoom.

Click here to Register!


How does it work?

Before the first class, you’ll receive an email that gives you access to the 6 weeks of scheduled Zoom classes.

If you can’t participate in the live Zoom class, you’ll have access to the video of the class on our YouTube channel.

Week 1

Introduction and Early Years
Organ Virtuoso

Week 2

Life in Cöthen
Brandenburg Concerti, Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, The Well-Tempered Clavier, Violin and Cello Suites

Week 3

Life in Leipzig I
The Passions

Week 4

Life in Leipzig II
Solo Concerti, Italian Concerto

Week 5

Keyboard Wizardry
The Goldberg Variations, The Art of Fugue, The Musical Offering

Week 6

The Cantata Journey
Cantatas, Mass in B minor

On the world stage, Dr. Sofia Mycyk has performed as soloist with orchestras in the United States and Canada, and has been featured at the Landowska Harpsichord Society in Chicago, Thursday Musical series in Minneapolis, at the Dekker Centre in North Battleford, the Lyell Gustin Recital Series, and the Ritornello Chamber Music Festival in Saskatoon. Recent performance highlights for Dr. Mycyk include the Lakes Area Music Festival, PianoFest in the Hamptons, LOFTrecital concerts in Minneapolis, and performing Colin McPhee’s Piano Concerto in Ted Mann Concert Hall, as winner of the concerto competition. This January Sofia collaborated with soprano Katya Khartova in a recital entitled “Ukrainian Art Song on a Starlit Night” presented and live-streamed by the Saskatoon Opera.

With the generous support of the Shevchenko Foundation, Worobetz Foundation and Ukrainian Canadian Congress, she released her first album entitled Hutsulian Watercolours in 2018, featuring solo piano music by Ukrainian composers.

In 2015 Sofia was the répétiteur for the Saskatoon Opera’s production of Puccini’s Madame
Butterfly, following the previous year’s engagement as Music Director for the Saskatoon Opera tour of Dean Burry’s The Brother’s Grimm.

Last spring Sofia graduated with a Doctorate in the Musical Arts in Piano Performance from the University of Minnesota where she held a Teaching Assistantship in Collaborative Piano. Her teachers have included Dr. Timothy Lovelace, Dr. Michael Kim and Bonnie Nicholson.

Besides playing the piano, Sofia loves the great outdoors, running, reading and staying in touch
with family and friends. She resides in Saskatoon, teaching, performing and collaborating. Her studio encompasses a full range of students from beginner to advanced levels, and includes theory and chamber music instruction.

Joseph Boulonge the Chevalier de Saint-Georges

Audiences today don’t know enough Joseph Bolonge, the Chevalier de Saint-Georges, and we need to change that because he was an important figure in music history who’s music is making a major comeback.

Chevalier de Saint-Georges was a champion fencer, classical composer, virtuoso violinist, and conductor of the leading symphony orchestra in Paris. Born in the French colony of Guadeloupe, he was the son of George Bologne de Saint-Georges, a wealthy married planter, and Anne dite Nanon, his wife’s African slave.

His father took him to France when he was young, and he was educated there, also becoming a champion fencer. During the French Revolution, the younger Saint-Georges served as a colonel of the Légion St.-Georges, the first all-black regiment in Europe. He fought on the side of the Republic. Today the Chevalier de Saint-Georges is best remembered as the first known classical composer who was of African ancestry; he composed numerous string quartets and other instrumental music, and opera.

The Chevalier played a key role in the aristocratic life of Paris in late 1700s, with close ties to the Palace of Versailles. The Chevalier often found himself the guest at the private musicales salons of Marie Antoinette at Versailles…with Chevalier playing his violin sonatas, with the Queen accompanying on the forte-piano.

Chevalier de Saint-Georges’ music was the toast of Paris and Versailles. During the 1780s, Saint-Georges’ star continued to get brighter and brighter. His output during this time was swift – operas, concertos, sonatas – but he also shaped the music that Paris was hearing. We have Saint-Georges’ to thank for the commissioning of Haydn’s Paris Symphonies, which the Chevalier conducted upon their premieres.

Curated Playlists to Explore

The science behind listening to music is fascinating.

Right now as we’re all staying at home, listening to music is a pass time that is well worth digging in to.

We decided we’d put together some hand-selected playlists for you to try out. If you’re itching to listen to something but having found the right mix, you’re in luck because we’ve curated each list for your enjoyment!

Maybe you needs something to spring clean to or you need some gardening inspiration – we’ve got the tracks for you!

Bach’s music is invigorating for your brain and your body.  His music detailed and methodical, planned out but ever fresh.  It will put a smile on your face, and help clear your brain.  This is music you can put on and go on with your day…but we highly recommend taking some time to sit and concentrate on his music!


Mozart’s music is utterly timeless – as effervescent and elegant now as the day it was written.  In his short 36 years, he wrote such a wealth of music filled with light and laughter.  Put this one while you’re working away on your laptop at home…it will keep you and your brain moving!


Known for writing some of the most heartbreakingly touching music ever, Brahms’ music is ideal for taking listening to curled up with some tea and breathing deeply.  Melodies that move with ease and tension that finds release, Brahms’ music is good for helping you drop your shoulders.

There is an amazing wealth of music that needs to be heard. The SSO has a passion for new music and for music that doesn’t get the recognition it deserves. So we brought you this list – from the amazing George Walker to the stunningly beautiful music of Dobrinka Tabakova, we think you’ll find something to love!

 

Orchestra 101

Whether you’ve always loved classical music or you’re just beginning your journey exploring orchestral music, we wanted to give you a chance to learn more about orchestral music.

Making music is so much more than just being able to bring the notes off a page to life.  Have you ever wondered what it takes to pick the right bow? Does a mouthpiece make a difference for a trumpeter? How do you tune a timpani?

Trumpeter Dean McNeill sheds some light on Tartini’s incredible Concerto for Trumpet

Find out more from our Principal Oboe Erin Brophey as she breaks down how to make an oboe reed!

Isn’t it Romantic – SSO Online Class with Eric

The Romantic era produced some of the biggest orchestral works ever written.

The emotional outpouring and go-big-or-go-home attitude of the composers, combined with the ever growing size of the orchestra, was a recipe for heart-on-sleeve music pushed to its limits. This class explores some of the more famous masterpieces of the time, as well as some tasty music you might never have heard before.

 

 

Click here to view the class!


How does it work?

Before the first class, you’ll receive an email that gives you access to the 6 weeks of scheduled Zoom classes.

If you can’t participate in the live Zoom class, you’ll have access to the video of the class on our YouTube channel

Week 1 – Early Romantic

Things are starting to simmer
Music of Mendelssohn, Schumann, Berlioz, and Mayer

Week 2 – Mid-Romantic

We’re turning up the heat
Music of Brahms, Bruckner, and Bronsart

Week 3 – Late Romantic Part 1

We’re on full boil now
Music of Grieg, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Holmes

Week 4 – Late Romantic Part 2

We’re on full boil now
Music of Tchaikovsky and Dvorak

Week 5 – Post-Romantic Part 1

The lid has blown off
Music of R. Strauss, Debussy, and Coleridge-Taylor

Week 6 – Post-Romantic Part 2

The lid has blown off
Music of Sibelius and Mahler

Live Stream Tips & Tricks

So, you’ve bought your Digital Concert Stream subscription, or your one time Digital Ticket for the SSO live-streamed concert. You are settled in your favourite chair, snacks and drinks in hand and you are ready to enjoy the concert from the comfort of your own home.

But how do you watch the show? Great question! Here are some ways to watch and a few tips and tricks to help maximize your viewing experience.

Before the concert begins you will receive an email with the link to the live stream. You can click the link on any device and start watching as soon as the stream goes live at the concert start time. It will open a new window that will show either an image of the orchestra or an image from the concert you’re about to watch.

There will be a countdown in the bottom left corner of the video and it should automatically begin at the appointed time if you have the window open. If it does not begin at 7:30 push the play button. You can watch on any of your devices that have internet access, even your TV! We have some common ways to get the live stream on your TV below.

This video will be available for 24 hours!  If you aren’t able to watch at the concert start time, happen to miss the first few minutes, or even if you want to watch it again, you can do that for 24 hours.

You can press pause. Unlike real life you can pause a live stream! If you need to take a break for whatever reason you can pause or rewind the live stream when you need to. The system will keep recording and it won’t interrupt your feed if you press play five, or more, minutes later.

Lag happens. If the video is choppy or isn’t lined up with the audio that could be due to your internet connection. We recommend pressing pause to let the stream load a little. If that doesn’t work, sometimes hitting the refresh button is all you need. Don’t worry about missing anything as the live stream automatically converts to a recording and is available for 24 hours from the concert start time.

If you have any issues please contact us! Sometimes email inboxes filter out messages from us so if you know you should have a link coming your way and it hasn’t arrived contact stream(at)saskatoonsymphony.org. We have someone monitoring the email before, during, and after the concert and they will get back to you as quickly as possible so that you can get back to enjoying your at home (or wherever) concert experience.

For Digital Concert Stream subscribers there is a back up link available to you on the Digital Concert Stream Page found under “My Account”. Click here to log in.

How to watch YouTube videos and live streams on your TV!

If you have a smart TV you can:

1. Open the YouTube link from the email on your device and click the save button (next to the share button on the bottom right corner) to add the video to your “watch later” playlist. When you open the YouTube app on your smart TV you will be able to find the video in your playlist and bring it up on your TV Screen. (This does require you to be signed in to your YouTube account on the device and your Smart TV.)
OR
2. Open the internet browser function on your TV and type in the private YouTube link you received in your email.

Some smart TVs will immediately recognize that you are playing a youtube video on your device and ask if you want to watch it on your TV. Every brand is different so often a quick google search will get you the answers you need!

If you have a Chromecast, Roku, Apple TV, or Amazon Fire you can:

1. Open the private YouTube link on your device and cast (or airplay) the video to your TV.

You can also click the link and click “Save” when the YouTube video has opened – then go to YouTube on your TV (through Roku, FireStick, etc), and you’ll find the saved video in your Library on the ride hand side menu.

If you do not have a smart TV or aren’t sure how to add apps to your TV you can:

1. Connect your laptop to the TV screen with an HDMI cable. This will allow you to use your TV as a mirrored screen or second screen. Push play on your laptop to start the video or live stream and it will show up on your TV.